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 The daily life of Recovery 
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Joined: Sun May 25, 2014 2:38 pm
Posts: 85
Hi all. It is late. Terribly so in fact, but I feel that rather than attack myself for my addictive behavior I would use my time to share my experience with all of you here. If you find it useful then I have accomplished my goal. On a daily basis I witness the principles of the program of recovery in action, and how they can be applied to my daily life. Whether it is on the Sales Floor at my job, or when I am going about my daily affairs at home doing dishes, laundry, and the like. I can find use for these principles in those places.

It really is fascinating. When life is especially awful, when a friend dies from overdose or suicide, or else I learn my bills are piling up, or my emotions go out of wack and I try to escape into the internet. I see how prayer, communication, and acceptance can save me from my own mal-adaptive coping mechanisms. Rather than continue to escape from myself, I can develop new habits, new thought patterns, and engage in a way of life that actively builds my personal health and thereby enables me to better serve.

From my perspective the concept of service is utterly alien. Beyond the desperate desire to stay clean and escape the horror of active addiction I did not comprehend how service - as in giving my energy to helping other people achieve peace - is useful to me. Other than a twisted interpretation of charity obfuscating the insipid codependency of my childhood, I was never actually exposed to service. Indeed, even at the rehab I attended, the definition of service was bizarre, vague, and largely remote to me. I did not comprehend how it could help me beyond making me feel less bad. Which means almost nothing to someone perpetually miserable.

I still struggle today. Though not nearly to the extent that I did during my stay at that therapeutic boarding school. Yet, the difference now is the freedom of work I can conduct to help other people around me throughout my life. There are tons of addicts who are simply looking for someone to listen, and are even willing to learn and change if someone will simply empathize. Which, to me, is all that effective program work really is. Expressing the experience of recovery to an another.

That's why I'm posting this at a quarter to 03:00, because it is important that this thought is given life. I hope you find this post useful.


Tue Jan 31, 2017 3:46 am
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Joined: Tue May 20, 2014 7:54 pm
Posts: 216
Sheeshmode wrote:
I did not comprehend how it could help me beyond making me feel less bad.


That's been a revelation for me as well and I can feel the difference when I'm not actively pursuing methods of service for others around me. Whether it being simply a good ear for them to talk to, putting up chairs at a meeting, sharing my ESH, or more tangible means of helping.

The fortunate thing about it is not ONLY does it FEEL good to do...but it has a lasting impact on my psychii. As an addict, I NEED to constantly exercise that muscle that tells me "It isn't all about me". To live in a world outside my own head, connecting with other people and being helpful is one of the best medicines for that.

Sheeshmode wrote:
There are tons of addicts who are simply looking for someone to listen, and are even willing to learn and change if someone will simply empathize. Which, to me, is all that effective program work really is. Expressing the experience of recovery to an another.


I think this part of what you said is worth emphasizing to people, especially if they're new to recovery.
The question of "How can I help?" could be a silent one in their heads (as it is for me sometimes) and knowing that just being there....just sharing or just listening is enough.

Sometimes it's more than enough and can be lifesaving for the other addict.

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Tue Jan 31, 2017 1:16 pm
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Joined: Sun May 25, 2014 2:38 pm
Posts: 85
Jesse wrote:
The question of "How can I help?" could be a silent one in their heads (as it is for me sometimes) and knowing that just being there....just sharing or just listening is enough.

Sometimes it's more than enough and can be lifesaving for the other addict.


Exactly. It's a common message in the rooms that people need to listen more than they share. Usually to imply or directly state that people shouldn't really be talking much about their experience, strength, and hope. Whether an addict has one day clean, or decades in recovery, they have a valuable experience that they can share with the others in the rooms. Sharing openly and honestly during a meeting is a form of service. By actively practicing the principles of the program those shares become more valuable by extension because the person has more experience living a life of recovery.


Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:59 am
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